How to Cite Sources

Citation is a vital part of proper, ethical academic writing. Whenever you used external evidence to support your arguments, you need to cite the source of that data correctly; otherwise, it is regarded as cheating. So, here we uncover the fundamental principles of correct referencing when using the most common citation standards – MLA, APA, and Harvard.

First comes the MLA format, which stands for the citation method of the Modern Language Association. As its name suggests, it is primarily used in papers related to language or literature subjects. Such preference is that the MLA format uses the author-page number, which is essential for literary work analysis. The tutor may often need to double-check the page from which the citation was taken to see whether the student understood the concept correctly.

Let’s See the MLA Example

Here is an example of MLA in-text citation:

#1 As Johnson suggests, eating much sugar is the primary cause of the early development of diabetes (45).

#2 Excessive consumption of processed food can cause elevated cholesterol heart problems in the long run (Peterson and Kane 234).

At the end of the paper, you should have a Works Cited page, a list of all sources you used throughout the text. Here is what the used sources would look like in the Works Cited list:

Johnson, Kate. Eating Sugar. Routledge, 2020. Print.

Peterson, David, and Kate Kane. “The Far-reaching Consequences of Processed Foods.” Journal of Nutrition, vol. 12, no. 2, 2018, pp. 1-15.

As you can see, the MLA style requires you to use the author’s full name, capitalize all titles, italicizing the names of books, and putting the names of journal articles in the inverted commas.

How to Cite the Purdue Owl in APA Requirements

The APA referencing style is the one of the American Psychological Association, and it differs from the MLA style’s conventions. First, it is an author-date system, meaning that you don’t need to indicate the page number unless you’re using a direct quote, word for word.

Thus, an in-text citation in APA would look as follows:

#1 As Johnson (2020) suggests, eating much sugar is the primary cause of the early development of diabetes.

#2 Excessive consumption of processed food can cause elevated cholesterol heart problems in the long run (Peterson & Kane, 2018).

The list of used sources is called References, and this is what the used sources would look like in the APA format:

Johnson, K. (2020). Eating sugar. Routledge.

Peterson, D., & Kane, K. (2018). The far-reaching consequences of processed foods. Journal of Nutrition, 12(2), 1-15.

How to Cite for a Bibliography: General Tips

A Bibliography is the name of the reference page for a Harvard or Chicago Turabian referencing style, as a rule. So, citing for a bibliography should follow the rules of that specific referencing style. For example, if you were assigned a paper in the Harvard style, your citation will look as follows:

Johnson, K., (2020). Eating sugar. New York, NY: Routledge.

If you need to cite a source in the Chicago/Turabian style, it will look as follows:

Johnson, Kate. Eating sugar. New York: Routledge, 2020.

How to Cite in a Research Paper MLA Style

If you have some research papers to cite in the MLA style, you should follow this referencing format’s general citation guidelines. As all guides suggest, any research paper’s citation should contain:

  • The author’s name.
  • The title of the paper.
  • Title of the source where it was published.
  • Volume and number of the journal (if it is published).
  • The name of the publisher.
  • Publication date.
  • URL (if it is a digital resource).

Not a Big Fan of Citation? We Can Do It for You!

Yes, we know that referencing often becomes a severe challenge to those who are still not accustomed to a new referencing style or don’t capture how to cite sources properly overall. Thus, our writers are ready to help you with this challenging task, 24/7 on standby to handle your urgent orders. Even if you have completed a rough draft of your paper and don’t know how to go on it, we can edit it and tailor the used references to your citation requirements.

Don’t put your grades at risk because of poor referencing skills. There is nothing shameful about asking for some help instead of spending hours learning a new subject, such as referencing, especially if you are badly short of time. Instead, contact our managers today to get the paper of your dream and dedicate time to some other pressing priorities while we’re polishing your paper to perfection.

 

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